How the Terrorist Attacks of 2001 Have Signalled a Fundamental Change in the Nature of Conflict

Gorka, Sebastian L. v. (2010) How the Terrorist Attacks of 2001 Have Signalled a Fundamental Change in the Nature of Conflict. Elcano Newsletter (69). 8 p.. ISSN 1698-5184

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Abstract

There are still fundamental questions to be answered on the nature of conflict post-9/11 and our existing understanding of war must be reassessed. In this ninth year of the epoch-defining conflict which for most Americans began on 11 September 2001, fundamental strategic questions remain unanswered. What is the nature of the enemy? Is it an organisation, network, movement or ideology? What are the long-term objectives of this enemy? Does it have a Clausewitzian centre of gravity? Should we even use the term enemy, or should the vast resources that Washington dedicates to national security be spent instead on ameliorating the ‘upstream factors’ underlying violent extremism (to quote a phrase used by a close advisor to President Barack Obama)? This paper attempts to answer some of these questions and explain why our existing understanding of war’s nature must be reassessed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Estudio sólo disponible en inglés
Uncontrolled Keywords: Terrorismo Internacional
Subjects: INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION > INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS > TERRORISM.
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION > INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS > VICTIMS.
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION > COUNTRIES AND REGIONS > UNITED STATES
CULTURE; SOCIETY > ETHICS; RELIGION > FUNDAMENTALISM
Divisions: Real Instituto Elcano, RIE
Depositing User: Jorge Horcas Pulido
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2012 13:41
Last Modified: 02 Apr 2012 14:10
URI: http://biblioteca.ribei.org/id/eprint/1961

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